John Stamatoyannopoulos

Associate Professor of Genome Sciences and Medicine

phone (Foege office): (206) 685-2672 | fax: (206) 267-1094
phone (Elliott lab office): (206) 267-1098
Foege S-310A, Box 355065
jstam [ a t ] u.washington.edu
website

Dr. Stamatoyannopoulos' laboratory focuses on how the human genome encodes transcriptional regulatory programs that unfold during development and differentiation, and how defects in these programs underlie common diseases.  

Research areas:

Ongoing efforts in the Stamatoyannopoulos lab:

  • To understand how and where regulatory information is encoded within the human genome, from individual nucleotides to genome-scale patterns of regulatory DNA activation

  • To define and analyze transcription factor regulatory networks

  • To map and determine the functional consequences of disease-associated non-coding variation in regulatory DNA

  • To define the genomic regulatory mechanisms underlying the genesis and perpetuation of cancer

  • To create next-generation technologies for visualizing and analyzing the living regulatory genome

Selected Publications:

The accessible chromatin landscape of the human genome.  Nature 489:75-82, 2012.

Systematic localization of common disease-associated variation in regulatory DNA. Science  337:1190-5, 2012.

Circuitry and dynaomics of human transcription factor regulatory networks.  Cell 150:1274-86, 2012.

Developmental fate and cellular maturity encoded in human regulatory DNA landscapes.  Cell 154:888-903, 2013.

Conservation of trans-acting circuitry during mammalian regulatory evolution. Nature 489:83-90, 2012.

Mouse regulatory DNA landscapes reveal global principles of cis-regulatory evolution.  Science 346:1007-12, 2014.

Exonic transcription factor binding directs codon choice and impacts protein evolution.  Science 342:1367-72, 2013.

An expansive human cis-regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints.  Nature 489:83-90, 2012.

Coupling transcription factor occupancy to nucleosome architecture with DNase-FLASH.  Nature Methods, 11:66-72, 2013.